A blog showcasing quilt patterns by Monica Curry. Get free patterns, quilting tutorials, and printables. Quilt patterns for every skill level are featured.

Saturday, 21 October 2017

Three Ways to Resize a Quilt Pattern: Step-by-Step

This month's studio tour is actually a post I did awhile back. I felt it was important enough information to re-post.

Quilt patterns can come in many sizes. But what if the size of the pattern isn't the size you want? Maybe you want a throw instead of a mini quilt or a baby quilt instead of a king size. To resize your pattern, you need to know the percentage to reduce or enlarge the blocks. Read below to learn three easy ways to get the percentage you need to resize your blocks and templates.




1. Do the Math
Below is the standard formula for reducing or enlarging.

Enlarging:
  1. What is the original block size? e.g. 6 inches
  2. What size do you want the new block to be? e.g. 8 inches
  3. Divide the new size by the original size, e.g. 8 ÷ 6 = 1.33. 
  4. Move the decimal point two steps to the right to get your percentage = 133%.
  5. Enter 133% into the copy machine to enlarge your 6-inch block to an 8-inch block.
Reducing:
  1. Do the opposite of above. 
  2. Divide the small size (e.g. 6") by the large size (e.g. 8") to get your reduction percentage, e.g. 6 ÷ 8 = 0.75 = 75% reduction.
2.  Proportional Scale
Proportional Scales may look a bit intimidating at first but they're easy to use. You can buy a Proportional Scale especially for quilters HERE.


How to use a proportional scale:
  1. On the bottom wheel, find the original size of your block (e.g. 6"), [Fig 1].
  2. Line up this number with the new size (e.g. 8") on the top wheel, [Fig 1].
  3. In the window, you'll see the percentage of the reduction or enlargement you need to resize your block, [Fig 2].
Note: The math formula and proportional scale results may be off a tiny bit. This is okay.

Figure 1

Figure 2

3.  Proportion Measurements Chart
Download my enlargement and reduction charts to find the percentages you need at a glance. Download PDF.
  1. Find the original measurement on the left side of the chart. 
  2. Go along that row until you get to the measurement you want on the top row. 
  3. The number in the intersecting box is the percentage you'll need to reduce or enlarge your block.



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Wednesday, 4 October 2017

Halloween Decor 2017: Beautiful Halloween wreath

A couple of years ago I posted a Halloween floral arrangement that I made for my home. This year, I made a Halloween wreath for my front door. I turn 60 this October and I love Halloween, so I'm having a birthday/Halloween party for my big day. I wanted a pretty wreath on the door to greet my guests. I saw some beautiful wreaths on Pinterest with skulls and ghoulish stuff, but I wanted a floral wreath. Everything I used to make this wreath is from the dollar store. It cost about $15 to make which proves you don't need a lot of money to pretty up your home for Halloween.  Happy Halloween one and all!


Floral Halloween wreath by Monica Curry